Tag: Fish and Other Marine Life

She Studies Sea Snakes by the Seafloor

Six to eight million years ago, a snake related to swamp snakes or tiger snakes slithered into the sea. Over evolutionary time, descendants of that snake developed flattened paddle tails, an ability to breathe through the skin and a valve to stop water from entering the lungs. Today these creatures live their entire lives in […]

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How Sharks Glow to Each Other Deep in the Ocean

Let us dive into the sea, beyond the colorful world of the sun. About 1,000 to 2,000 feet down, we’ll arrive at a place where only blue beams in sunlight can penetrate. This is the home of the swell shark and chain catshark. Look at them with your human, land-ready eyes, and all you’ll see […]

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A Battle Is Raging in the Tree of Life

Poriferans, better known as sponges, are squishy, stationary and filled with holes. Ctenophores, also called comb jellies, are soft blobs wreathed by feathery cilia. For the past decade, the two groups have been caught up in a raging battle, at least in the pages of scientific journals. At stake is a noble place in evolutionary […]

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The Creepy Anglerfish Comes to Light. (Just Don’t Get Too Close.)

Few wonders of the sunless depths appear quite so ghoulish or improbable as anglerfish, creatures that dangle bioluminescent lures in front of needlelike teeth. They are fish that fish. Typically, the rod of flesh extending from the forehead glows at the tip. Anglerfish can wiggle the lure to better mimic living bait. Most species can […]

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Do Lox and Other Smoked Fish Increase Cancer Risk?

Q. Does eating smoked fish, such as smoked salmon or whitefish, increase the risk of colorectal cancer or other cancers, the way processed and deli meats do? A. It might. From a cancer risk perspective, the American Institute for Cancer Research considers smoked and cured fish in the same category as processed meats. Though other […]

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Jordan Creates Artificial Reef From Decommissioned Military Vehicles

A popular Jordanian coastal resort on the Red Sea has found a new use for out-of-service tanks, armored troop carriers and even a helicopter: as building blocks of an artificial reef and an underwater museum. A helicopter donated by the Royal Jordanian Air Force was one of several military relics submerged on Wednesday as part […]

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Pilot Whales in Georgia Are Saved From Being Beached

The camera panned to the water’s edge on St. Simons Island’s East Beach in Georgia, where a row of short-finned pilot whales writhed, clicked and whistled as their shiny black bodies caught breaking waves in the late afternoon light on Tuesday. “They’re going to die if they don’t get help,” said a woman’s voice on […]

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For Cephalopod Week, Dive Into the World of Octopuses, Squids and More

Octopuses, squids and their cephalopod cousins have haunted the human imagination for centuries. Their long, unfurling arms and temperamental behavior have inspired legends, from the Kraken of Norse mythology to the giant Japanese Akkorokamui that supposedly lurks at the bottom of the ocean, waiting to swallow ships and whales whole. Cephalopods sit apart from other […]

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What’s Killing Pacific Whales?

MONTEREY BAY, Calif — Tourists come here from around the world to watch whales. It’s common to see humpbacks leaping out of the water and fin whales slapping the waves with their flukes. If you’re lucky, you’ll catch a gray whale poking its head out of the water to scope out the surroundings. And if […]

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Cuttlefish Arms Are Not So Different From Yours

The cuttlefish and its relatives, squid and octopuses, often strike human observers as floating aliens wreathed in sucker-covered limbs — boneless, squirming appendages that would seem to have nothing in common with our own arms and legs. But hidden under the superficial differences, a new study shows, are some profound similarities: Human and cuttlefish limbs […]

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Giant Squid, Phantom of the Deep, Reappears on Video

Edie Widder was eating lunch in the mess hall of the Research Vessel Point Sur on Tuesday when her colleague Nathan J. Robinson dashed in. He didn’t have to say anything — in fact, he wasn’t yet quite able to say anything. She ran from the table, made certain by his flailing arms and the […]

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Russia to Release First Whales Held in ‘Jail’ for Months

MOSCOW — Russia on Thursday started the process of releasing almost 100 valuable orcas and belugas that have been held for months in what became known as the “whale jail” in the country’s Far East, following an international outcry and intervention by President Vladimir V. Putin. The movement of the first batch of two orcas […]

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The Fish Egg That Traveled Through a Swan’s Gut, Then Hatched

Killifish manage to endure a variety of environments. The wee freshwater fish survive in isolated desert pools, lakes made by flood water, even seasonal ponds that are little more than puddles. One place scientists didn’t expect to find them was in swan poop. But an international team of researchers reported last week in the journal […]

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To Map a Coral Reef, Peel Back the Seawater

Coral reefs comprise just 1 percent of the ocean floor yet they are home to 25 percent of the world’s marine fish, a growing source of protein for people. But reefs are imperiled by a range of threats including warming waters, acidifying seas, destructive fishing methods, and agricultural and other runoff. Moreover, scientists have only […]

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Fish Cannons, Koi Herpes and Other Tools to Combat Invasive Carp

Why is someone loading a fish into a tube? That’s Whooshh. It’s a high-tech fish removal system, something like a cross between a potato gun and a pneumatic tube at a drive-in bank. And that fish is a common carp, one the oldest and most invasive fish on the planet. [Like the Science Times page […]

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Meet the Deep-Sea Dragonfish. Its Transparent Teeth Are Stronger Than a Piranha’s.

Unassuming dragonfish lurk in the twilight zone, more than 1,600 feet under the surface of the ocean. Dark, eel-like, and roughly three and a half inches long, these deep-sea creatures glow with bioluminescence and have evolved a complex sensory system that allows them to detect even the subtlest movements in the ocean’s shadowy realms, then […]

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The Shorebirds of Delaware Bay Are Going Hungry

REEDS BEACH, N.J. — On a recent spring day at this remote beach, hundreds of shorebirds flapped frantically beneath a net trapping them on the sand. Dozens of volunteers rushed to disentangle the birds and place them gently in covered crates. On a nearby sand dune, teams of scientists and volunteers attached metal leg bands, […]

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A School of Fish, Captured in a Fossil

Fish can band together, sometimes in the millions, to form a school or shoal. They will move as one, like a flock of birds, so long as each fish stays in line with the fish that surround it. Modern fish, as well as other kinds of animals, already know how to move as one. But […]

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Ocean Protection Is an Urban Issue

In New York City, it’s often easy to think that ocean conservation is an issue for someplace else — tropical islands, coral reefs, the Gulf of Mexico, the Arctic. But New York City is an archipelago, a reality that can be obscured by the concrete jungle. The five boroughs — four of them on islands […]

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Bangladesh’s Fishing Ban Leaves Coastal Towns in ‘Nightmare Situation’

DHAKA, Bangladesh — This time of year, Mohammad Shamsuddin normally earns about $120 a month working with the crew of a fishing boat off the coast of Bangladesh. But on Monday, the central government imposed a 65-day national ban on coastal fishing — the most restrictive ever in Bangladesh, a poor and densely populated country […]

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