Tag: Democracy

Make the Guarantee Clause Great Again

The Supreme Court’s 5-4 ruling in Rucho v. Common Cause last month dealt a harsh blow to American democracy. For the last decade, federal courts were the strongest bulwark against partisan gerrymandering in the states, but Chief Justice John Roberts closed the door on that remedy in the future. In his opinion, though, he accidentally […]

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To Beat the Gerrymander, Think Outside the Lines

Voters in North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Maryland deserve fair maps that don’t lock in a partisan advantage for either Republicans or Democrats. Federal courts nationwide had recently begun to insist on that, repeatedly declaring districts tainted with extreme partisan intent unconstitutional. The Supreme Court put an end to that dream last week. Its […]

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How AI can strengthen and defend democracy

Democratic societies the world over have come under attack in this digital era — and in ways many probably never thought possible in their lifetime. The 2016 U.S. presidential election was undermined by a two-pronged approach involving the Russian military and Facebook posts from the Internet Research Agency (IRA). Other recent examples have included ransomware […]

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Restoring Democracy is Not Open to Debate

Hours before Thursday’s Democratic presidential debate, the Supreme Court issued two rulings that could greatly affect our democracy. One decision failed to stop the drive toward increasingly partisan gerrymanders, and the other temporarily blocked the Trump Administration’s attempt to leverage the decennial United States Census for partisan advantage. Despite this timely news peg, the debate moderators failed to […]

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Advocates Want Everyone Counted, No Matter the Fate of the Citizenship Question

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Commerce Department has the authority to add a question to the 2020 census asking about the citizenship status of respondents, but it needs a better reason to do so. In a complex decision, the justices found the explanations provided by the Trump administration for adding the question—that it […]

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Democracy Fights Back

Florida Republicans recently adopted a poll tax to preserve a Jim Crow statute. That such a statement should be written to describe current events—not merely actions condemned to the dustbin of history—is harrowing but, sadly, far from surprising. The year is 2019, not 1950, but the fight over who can participate in our democracy is […]

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Socialism in No Country

In her illuminating essay “The Revolutionary Tradition and its Lost Treasure”—itself a lost treasure, as so few people who consider themselves within the Western revolutionary tradition ever read or even know about it—Hannah Arendt explains a political concept Thomas Jefferson advanced toward the end of his life, involving the creation of what he called “wards” […]

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Socialism and the Democracy Deficit

What is Democratic Socialism? I read considerable talk about “the democratic” as applying to the process of getting socialism; damn little about it as an adjective applying to socialism when you get it.
  — John Dewey to James T. Farrell, 8 November, 1948 Socialism, the political economy that for a century dared not speak its name […]

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Reclaiming the Future

One day last February, I found myself seated on stage, rather incongruously, between the neoconservative Never Trumper–turned–Resistance hero Bill Kristol and my friend Natasha Lennard, a radical anti-fascist writer and activist I first met at Occupy Wall Street back in 2011. We had all made our way to the New School for the closing panel […]

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