Tag: Constitution (US)

Trump Asks Supreme Court to Bar Release of His Tax Returns

WASHINGTON — President Trump asked the Supreme Court on Thursday to bar his accounting firm from turning over eight years of his tax returns to Manhattan prosecutors. The case, the first concerning Mr. Trump’s personal conduct and business dealings to reach the court, could yield a major ruling on the scope of presidential immunity from […]

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What Trump Is Hiding From the Impeachment Hearings

The public impeachment hearings this week will be at least as important for what is not said as for what is. Congress will no doubt focus a lot on President Trump’s dealings with Ukraine and his secret plan to get that government to announce a public investigation of the man he considered his chief political […]

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Detroit’s Schools Are Unconstitutionally Unequal

For much of the past decade, schoolchildren in Detroit were forced to endure conditions that can only be described as abhorrent. In many schools, classroom temperatures exceeded 90 degrees during the spring and summer, and neared freezing during frigid Michigan winters. Mold was endemic in some school buildings, and vermin was common in others. In […]

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The Big Problem With Wealth Taxes

Senator Elizabeth Warren unveiled a new wealth tax proposal last week that she says will raise — along with her previously announced wealth tax plan — $3.75 trillion over the next decade. Senator Bernie Sanders says his wealth tax will yield $4.35 trillion over the same period. We fear these figures are vast overestimates. The […]

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Trump Tax Return Case Confronts Supreme Court With a Momentous Choice

WASHINGTON — In a matter of days, President Trump will ask the Supreme Court to rule on his bold claim that he is absolutely immune from criminal investigation while he remains in office. If the court agrees to hear the case, its decision is likely to produce a major statement on the limits of presidential […]

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What Happens When a President and Congress Go to War?

In early October, President Trump’s White House counsel, Pat Cipollone, sent a defiant letter to four leaders of the House of Representatives. No one in the Trump administration, Cipollone declared, would participate in the impeachment inquiry that Speaker Nancy Pelosi opened in September after Trump’s phone call with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine came to […]

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Nancy Pelosi Should Not Be President

Most Republican gripes that an impeachment of President Trump would “overturn” the 2016 election are laughable. The House of Representatives’s power to impeach is right there in the Constitution, and Republican members had no qualms about using that power against President Bill Clinton, whose offenses were far less serious than those Mr. Trump has already […]

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Impeachment Does Not ‘Overturn’ an Election

As House Democrats ramp up their impeachment investigation into President Trump, an increasingly vocal charge from the president’s supporters (and the White House) is that the House is attempting to “overturn” the results of the 2016 election. The charge is that impeaching and removing an elected president is illegitimate because it is anti-democratic — because […]

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Will the Supreme Court Stand Up for an Unarmed Mexican Teenager Shot by a Border Agent?

Earlier this year, aides to President Trump, who was raging in frustration at his inability to control the country’s border with Mexico, talked him out of the notion of simply shooting migrants. That would be illegal, the aides pointed out. I was incredulous this month when I read the article in The Times recounting this […]

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‘Centrism Is Canceled’: High Schoolers Debate the Impeachment Inquiry

CHALMETTE, La. — It was impeachment day in Mr. Dier’s world history class at Chalmette High School. Andrew Johnson, the first impeached president, was on the lesson plan. So was Richard M. Nixon, who avoided facing such a fate by resigning. Bill Clinton, who also was impeached but never convicted, was also part of the […]

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As Inquiry Widens, McConnell Is Said to See Impeachment Trial as Inevitable

WASHINGTON — It was only a few weeks ago that the top Senate Republican was hinting that his chamber would make short work of impeachment. But this week, Senator Mitch McConnell sat his colleagues down over lunch in the Capitol and warned them to prepare for an extended impeachment trial of President Trump. According to […]

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Supreme Court Case Could Have Huge Effect on Puerto Rican Debt Crisis

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court seemed prepared on Tuesday to reject a constitutional challenge to the federal response to the worst debt crisis in Puerto Rican history, one that threatened basic services like schools and hospitals, some $50 billion in public pension obligations and more than $70 billion in debts to bondholders. The crisis got […]

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‘Faithless Electors’ Could Tip the 2020 Election. Will the Supreme Court Stop Them?

WASHINGTON — On Dec. 19, 2016, a little more than a month after the presidential election, members of the Electoral College gathered around the nation to cast their votes. Ten of them went rogue. A swing by that number of electors would have been enough to change the outcomes in five of the previous 58 […]

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Trump’s Politics Aren’t Pretty. That’s How His Voters Like It.

The Constitution depends on rivalry and jealousy. It may not be an engine of perpetual conflict, but the separate branches of government and chambers of Congress are supposed to be wary of encroachments on their authority. James Madison hoped that the multitude of interests represented in the legislature would prevent a single will, embodied in […]

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Donald Trump Dreams of Presidential Infallibility

The news cycle has already blown past it, but I think we should dwell a little more on that time, just a few days ago, when President Trump declared himself above the Constitution. No, the president did not say, “I am above the Constitution.” But that was the gist of the eight-page letter sent on […]

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Honor the Civil Rights Movement. Hold Trump Accountable.

I have not come to support an impeachment inquiry lightly. I have been a reluctant participant in this investigation, not because I approve of the president’s conduct, his tone or his divisiveness, but because I believe that impeachment must remain a last resort, reserved for situations in which the safety of the American people and […]

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The House Can Play Hardball, Too. It Can Arrest Giuliani.

In his letter to House leadership, the White House counsel, Pat Cipollone, drew a line in the sand: The administration will not “participate in” the impeachment proceedings in any way. The odd language of “participate in” — presidential impeachment is not meant to be a collaboration between Congress and the president — obscures the central […]

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A Supreme Court Abortion Case That Tests the Court Itself

Under the rules that normally govern the American judicial system, the Louisiana abortion law at the center of a case the Supreme Court added to its docket last week is flagrantly unconstitutional. My goal in this column is to make visible not only the stakes in the case but also Louisiana’s strategy for saving its […]

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Trump’s Sweeping Case Against Impeachment: A Political Document Intended to Delegitimize the Process

WASHINGTON — Breathtaking in scope, defiant in tone, the White House’s refusal to cooperate with the House impeachment inquiry amounts to an unabashed challenge to America’s longstanding constitutional order. In effect, President Trump is making the sweeping assertion that he can ignore Congress as it weighs his fate because he considers the impeachment effort unfair […]

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Will Puerto Rico Still Be Allowed to Govern Itself?

In 1947, Congress passed and President Harry Truman signed a law giving the people of Puerto Rico the right to elect their own governor. Until then, all territories of the United States, including Puerto Rico, had been governed by men appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate. Most governors had been known more […]

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