Tag: Civil Rights and Liberties

N.S.A. Phone Program Cost $100 Million, but Produced Only Two Unique Leads

WASHINGTON — A National Security Agency system that analyzed logs of Americans’ domestic phone calls and text messages cost $100 million from 2015 to 2019, but yielded only a single significant investigation, according to a newly declassified study. Moreover, only twice during that four-year period did the program generate unique information that the F.B.I. did […]

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As Domestic Terrorists Outpace Jihadists, New U.S. Law Is Debated

When the New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness issued its terrorism threat assessment for 2020 last week, it noted a marked shift. The threat level from violent, homegrown extremists, and specifically white supremacists, was marked in red as the top category: “High.” The threat from the Islamic State, Al Qaeda and their ilk […]

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After Fighting Nazis, Black G.I.s Faced Racism in U.S. Military

In commemoration of Black History Month, the latest article from “Beyond the World War II We Know,” a series by The Times that documents lesser-known stories from World War II, focuses on the challenges of black troops stationed in Germany in the aftermath of the war. When Walter White, the head of the N.A.A.C.P. from […]

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The Case for a More Negative Black History Month

Black History Month is traditionally a time to honor black Americans and, theoretically, accord them their proper place in American history. Every February we re-examine the exemplary lives of Harriet Tubman, Charles Drew, Frederick Douglass and those of lesser known but truly significant leaders, artists, scientists, thinkers and others. The occasion has always felt too […]

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California Plans to Apologize to Japanese-Americans

Nearly 80 years after President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized the military to move thousands of Japanese-Americans into internment camps, California plans to formally apologize for its role in their detention. State Assemblyman Al Muratsuchi introduced a resolution on Jan. 28 that is expected to receive broad support this week from the rest of the Assembly. […]

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New Campus Sexual Misconduct Rules Will Tackle Dating Violence

WASHINGTON — Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’s pending rules on sexual misconduct at the nation’s schools and colleges will include provisions to shore up protections for victims of stalking and dating violence, a response to lethal attacks that have underscored the weakness of current policies. The rules will for the first time cement domestic violence, dating […]

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An Algorithm That Grants Freedom, or Takes It Away

PHILADELPHIA — Darnell Gates sat at a long table in a downtown Philadelphia office building. He wore a black T-shirt with “California” in bright yellow letters on the chest. He had never been to the state, but he hoped to visit family there after finishing his probation. When Mr. Gates was released from jail in […]

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Justice Dept. Opens Civil Rights Investigation Into Mississippi Prisons

For weeks, Mississippi’s prisons have been gripped by crisis. At least a dozen inmates have been slain or killed themselves, and feuding gangs have forced lockdowns. Images and videos taken on smuggled cellphones have highlighted deteriorating conditions, and legislators and activists have asked for federal intervention. The Justice Department responded to the turmoil on Wednesday […]

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The Journalist and the Murderers

RACE AGAINST TIME A Reporter Reopens the Unsolved Murder Cases of the Civil Rights EraBy Jerry Mitchell In “Race Against Time,” Jerry Mitchell chronicles belated efforts — many of them spurred by his own work as a journalist — to prosecute perpetrators of racially motivated violence in Alabama and Mississippi during the 1960s. Beginning in […]

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Overlooked No More: Homer Plessy, Who Sat on a Train and Stood Up for Civil Rights

Since 1851, many remarkable black men and women did not receive obituaries in The New York Times. This month, with Overlooked, we’re adding their stories to our archives. When Homer Plessy boarded the East Louisiana Railway’s No. 8 train in New Orleans on June 7, 1892, he knew his journey to Covington, La., would be […]

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Kenya’s High Court Delays National Biometric ID Program

NAIROBI, Kenya — Kenya’s high court on Thursday temporarily suspended the country’s new national biometric identity program until the government enacts laws to protect the security of the data and prevent discrimination against minorities. The government had said the IDs would be required for all Kenyan citizens and foreign residents to access a broad range […]

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12 Deaths in Mississippi Tell a Grim Story

Twelve people have died in Mississippi state prisons since the start of the new year. Nine deaths occurred in the Mississippi State Penitentiary at Parchman. At least one was a suicide. Most were a result of violence between inmates: beatings, stabbings and other fatal altercations. State officials have promised to stop the violence. After news […]

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Affirmative Action: The Uniquely American Experiment

THE AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PUZZLEA Living History From Reconstruction to TodayBy Melvin I. Urofsky For two and a half centuries America enslaved its black population, whose labor was a critical source of the country’s capitalist modernization and prosperity. Upon the abolition of legal, interpersonal slavery, the exploitation and degradation of blacks continued in the neoslavery system […]

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Police Officer Charged With Murder in Killing of Handcuffed Suspect in Maryland

A police corporal in Maryland was charged with second-degree murder on Tuesday in the fatal shooting of a suspect who had been handcuffed in the back of his patrol car the previous night, the authorities said. The corporal, Michael Owen, a 10-year veteran of the Prince George’s Police Department, shot William H. Green seven times […]

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The Many Polarizations of America

This month has brought a surfeit of interesting new books about American politics, most of them attempts to explain exactly how we reached our current era of gridlock and demagogy, in which disliked establishments and disreputable populists clash by night. This task means that they are necessarily studies in polarization, in the roots of partisan […]

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The Trump Administration Is Clearing the Way for Housing Discrimination

On Monday, the nation honored the towering legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. But the progress he demanded remains unfinished, and nowhere more than in the deeply segregated neighborhoods many of us call home. Dr. King understood that where a person lives determines so many of their opportunities, including access to good […]

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40 of America’s Greatest Writers on Key Supreme Court Decisions

FIGHT OF THE CENTURY Writers Reflect on 100 Years of Landmark ACLU CasesEdited by Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman Americans have always loved a courtroom drama. As attacks on the rule of law become more frequent and intense, the public has rekindled its often dormant affection for public-interest lawyers — endearingly unglamorous defenders of principle […]

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The Bearable Whiteness of ‘Little Women’

About a week before “Little Women” premiered in December, the tweets started rolling across my timeline. “I don’t care about ‘Little Women’,” read one. Another pondered why this movie was being made now. And a perhaps kinder one that more aptly described the derision, “Little Women is white women’s Black Panther.” I think I understand […]

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