Tag: Asian-Americans

Andrew Yang Knows You May Disagree With Him About Shane Gillis

Shane Gillis, a 31-year-old stand-up comedian who was named last week to the “Saturday Night Live” cast, has mimicked caricatures of Chinese accents. He has called it a “hassle” to have to speak with a waiter in a Chinese restaurant. He has used a racial slur to refer to the entrepreneur Andrew Yang. And in […]

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‘S.N.L.’ Has Long Lacked Asian Players. One Just Joined the Cast.

For all the comedians and actors who have come and gone from “Saturday Night Live” in its four decades, there has been a near-complete absence of Asian performers onscreen. The NBC show is taking a step toward rectifying that. Bowen Yang — the son of Chinese immigrants and an “S.N.L.” writer — will be one […]

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From Pizza to Tortillas, a Midwestern Chef Defies Assumptions

MINNEAPOLIS — Last summer, Ann Kim announced that she would open a restaurant inspired by a trip to Valle de Guadalupe, Mexico, where she had tasted handmade heirloom blue-corn tortillas that moved her to tears. The Twin Cities news media responded with reports about her intention to open a Mexican restaurant. A year later, Ms. […]

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Lock-Ins and Walkouts: The Students Changing City Schools From the Inside

They have locked themselves inside school buildings for days on end to protest discrimination. They have called into Mayor Bill de Blasio’s weekly radio show to demand action on integrating schools, and have even followed him to Iowa to confront him about arrests and suspensions for students of color. Education politics in New York City […]

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Desegregation Plan: Eliminate All Gifted Programs in New York

For years, New York City has essentially maintained two parallel public school systems. A group of selective schools and programs geared to students labeled gifted and talented is filled mostly with white and Asian children. The rest of the system is open to all students and is predominantly black and Hispanic. Now, a high-level panel […]

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The Comedians Challenging Stereotypes About Asian-American Masculinity

NOT THAT LONG AGO, my family, which includes my mother and her two siblings — all three of whom are Chinese — went to a comedy show at a well-known nightclub in Manhattan. My aunt and uncle, who live in Long Island, had gone there on an early date decades ago. My mom and her […]

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Overlooked No More: Lau Sing Kee, War Hero Jailed for Helping Immigrants

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Andrew R. Chow Lau Sing Kee was an American war hero, but he was also mocked as a “Chinese boy.” He was a civic leader, but he also became a convicted criminal for skirting discriminatory […]

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Close the Curtain on ‘Miss Saigon’

LOS ANGELES — “Miss Saigon” is revived and on tour again, playing in a theater near me. This is exciting news for some fans of Broadway musicals, and for Asian and Asian-American actors with the chance for important roles. For others, to whom “Miss Saigon” perpetuates deeply held notions of Asian inferiority, this is bad […]

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16,000 Readers Shared Their Experiences of Being Told to ‘Go Back.’ Here Are Some of Their Stories.

July 19, 2019 “Go back to where you came from.” These seven words are seared into the minds of countless Americans — a reminder that they haven’t always been welcome in the country where they were born or naturalized because of their appearance, language or religion. For many, the pain of past encounters throbbed again […]

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When a Dating Dare Leads to Months of Soul Searching

At 2 a.m., two blocks from Chinatown, Sarah ended our first date by telling me that my race might be an issue. What was supposed to be a one-hour coffee date had evolved into a nine-hour marathon. From discussing the five love languages during dinner to telling stories about our exes at Coit Tower, we […]

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Viewfinders: 10 Y.A. Novelists Spin Fiction From Vintage Photos

As we digitize The New York Times’s photography archives, we often come across images that resonate in unusual and unexpected ways, even after a century. We wondered what novelists might make of some of them — so we asked. To be specific, we asked 10 acclaimed authors to write pieces of short fiction inspired by […]

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Amid Racial Divisions, Mayor’s Plan to Scrap Elite School Exam Fails

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] Richard A. Carranza, the city schools chancellor, insisted last week that the plan to eliminate the entrance exam that dictates admission into Stuyvesant High School and the city’s other top public high schools was gaining traction. “There’s some real […]

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Jeremy Lin, ‘Reppin’ Asians With Everything I Have,’ Is Bigger Than an N.B.A. Title

Want more basketball in your inbox? Sign up for Marc Stein’s weekly N.B.A. newsletter here. TORONTO — My 4-year-old and 7-year-old nephews regularly practice jump shots in their backyard, and they watch the N.B.A. attentively enough to know that the Toronto Raptors’ best player, Kawhi Leonard, wears the No. 2. In the fall, the older […]

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What if They Made a Dirty Rom-Com About People Who Looked Like Them?

CULVER CITY, Calif. — The sex scene needed something. A headpiece, they call it in comedy. A funny bit at the start to bridge the emotional gap between the scene that leads up to it — in this case, the sudden death of a beloved character — and the very different scene that follows it: […]

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Eavesdropping on Ocean Vuong’s New Book

Before he sold his first novel, “On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous,” for a hefty advance, Ocean Vuong was writing poetry. Which means he was broke. Which means he was making $8 an hour cleaning toilets at a Panera Bread. If you worked your way to regional manager, you could make 60 grand a year. “That […]

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