Tag: Asian-Americans

The Story of the Great Japanese-American Novel

IT WAS THE LATE ’60s, and a University of California, Berkeley, undergraduate named Shawn Wong wanted to write the next great American novel. He was born in Oakland, Calif., in 1949 to parents who emigrated from Tianjin, China, both of whom died by the time he was 15. Wong had fallen in love with literature, […]

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Andrew Yang Knows How to Fit In. Somehow That’s Making Him an Outlier.

Last month, Jon Sarlin, a producer at CNN, posted a short video on his Twitter feed — an on-the-street interview with Russell Peterson, a Trump voter who’d had a change of heart. Peterson, with his goatee, tank top and North Carolina twang, came across the way an unimaginative actor might play a Trump supporter on […]

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Scandalized by Ali Wong’s Stand-Up? Brace Yourself for Her Book

When Ali Wong is testing new jokes in front of an audience, she does something strange. “I talk very quietly in a monotone voice where there’s almost zero performance in there, to see if the material holds up,” she said. Purposefully boring an audience might sound like career suicide for a stand-up, but Wong insists […]

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5 Takeaways From the Harvard Ruling

In one of the most closely watched lawsuits concerning affirmative action and higher education, a federal judge on Tuesday ruled that Harvard could continue considering race in its admissions process in pursuit of a diverse class. The plaintiffs, Students for Fair Admissions, made four claims: that Harvard had intentionally discriminated against Asian-Americans, used race as […]

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Harvard Does Not Discriminate Against Asian-Americans in Admissions, Judge Rules

A federal judge on Tuesday rejected claims that Harvard had discriminated against Asian-Americans in admissions, saying that the university had a right to choose a diverse class. The challenge to the university’s admissions process came from a group hoping to overturn a longstanding Supreme Court precedent that allows race to be considered as one factor […]

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Why It Matters That ‘Emily Doe’ in the Brock Turner Case Is Asian-American

When Emily Doe’s victim impact statement was published on BuzzFeed in June 2016, I read it in one breathless sitting. The previous day, she had read her statement at the sentencing hearing for Brock Turner, who was found guilty of three counts of felony sexual assault by a California jury. The maximum sentence for such […]

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The College Admissions Trilemma

For decades America’s universities have made extensive efforts to achieve racial diversity within their student bodies. The official justifications for these efforts have changed depending on political currents and Supreme Court whims: What began as explicit redress for African-Americans eventually morphed into a commitment to diversity as an educational good unto itself. But the implicit […]

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Andrew Yang Knows You May Disagree With Him About Shane Gillis

Shane Gillis, a 31-year-old stand-up comedian who was named last week to the “Saturday Night Live” cast, has mimicked caricatures of Chinese accents. He has called it a “hassle” to have to speak with a waiter in a Chinese restaurant. He has used a racial slur to refer to the entrepreneur Andrew Yang. And in […]

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‘S.N.L.’ Has Long Lacked Asian Players. One Just Joined the Cast.

For all the comedians and actors who have come and gone from “Saturday Night Live” in its four decades, there has been a near-complete absence of Asian performers onscreen. The NBC show is taking a step toward rectifying that. Bowen Yang — the son of Chinese immigrants and an “S.N.L.” writer — will be one […]

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From Pizza to Tortillas, a Midwestern Chef Defies Assumptions

MINNEAPOLIS — Last summer, Ann Kim announced that she would open a restaurant inspired by a trip to Valle de Guadalupe, Mexico, where she had tasted handmade heirloom blue-corn tortillas that moved her to tears. The Twin Cities news media responded with reports about her intention to open a Mexican restaurant. A year later, Ms. […]

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Lock-Ins and Walkouts: The Students Changing City Schools From the Inside

They have locked themselves inside school buildings for days on end to protest discrimination. They have called into Mayor Bill de Blasio’s weekly radio show to demand action on integrating schools, and have even followed him to Iowa to confront him about arrests and suspensions for students of color. Education politics in New York City […]

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Desegregation Plan: Eliminate All Gifted Programs in New York

For years, New York City has essentially maintained two parallel public school systems. A group of selective schools and programs geared to students labeled gifted and talented is filled mostly with white and Asian children. The rest of the system is open to all students and is predominantly black and Hispanic. Now, a high-level panel […]

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The Comedians Challenging Stereotypes About Asian-American Masculinity

NOT THAT LONG AGO, my family, which includes my mother and her two siblings — all three of whom are Chinese — went to a comedy show at a well-known nightclub in Manhattan. My aunt and uncle, who live in Long Island, had gone there on an early date decades ago. My mom and her […]

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Overlooked No More: Lau Sing Kee, War Hero Jailed for Helping Immigrants

Overlooked is a series of obituaries about remarkable people whose deaths, beginning in 1851, went unreported in The Times. By Andrew R. Chow Lau Sing Kee was an American war hero, but he was also mocked as a “Chinese boy.” He was a civic leader, but he also became a convicted criminal for skirting discriminatory […]

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Close the Curtain on ‘Miss Saigon’

LOS ANGELES — “Miss Saigon” is revived and on tour again, playing in a theater near me. This is exciting news for some fans of Broadway musicals, and for Asian and Asian-American actors with the chance for important roles. For others, to whom “Miss Saigon” perpetuates deeply held notions of Asian inferiority, this is bad […]

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