Tag: Arts

Faces of MIT: Lydia Brosnahan

A lot of behind-the-scenes work goes into creating an art installation or a theater production – not just by those making or performing their craft, but also by the staff members who coordinate the logistics of exhibits and events. One of the people at MIT who helps artists bring their projects to life is Lydia […]

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Exploring the meaning of home

Moving from his birthplace of Iquitos, Peru, to Anchorage then to Homer, Peruvian-American artist J. Piotreck Pawlikowski creates colorful acrylic paintings inspired by the peace and beauty of the landscape around him. Currently on display in the “Finding Home” exhibit at Homer Council on the Arts are two of Pawlikowski’s acrylic paintings. “By My Side” […]

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Play it again, Spirio

Seated at the grand piano in MIT’s Killian Hall last fall, first-year student Jacqueline Wang played through the lively opening of Mozart’s “Sonata in B-flat major, K.333.” When she’d finished, Mi-Eun Kim, pianist and lecturer in MIT’s Music and Theater Arts Section (MTA), asked her to move to the rear of the hall. Kim tapped […]

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Inaugural exhibit

Currently on display at Grace Ridge Brewing are large print Alaska-themed landscape and wildlife photographs by Homer photographer David Veith. Included in the exhibit are images of mountains, glaciers, lighthouses, churches, the aurora borealis, moose, sandhill cranes, bear, eagles, otters, birds of prey, and many others. “Contemplating Bull Moose” showcases a large bull moose at […]

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Miguel Zenón, assistant professor of jazz at MIT, wins Grammy Award

MIT Music and Theater Arts Assistant Professor Miguel Zenón has won a Grammy for Best Latin Jazz Album for his work on “El Arte Del Bolero Vol. 2.” Zenón recorded the album with Luis Perdomo, a follow-up to their critically-acclaimed “El Arte Del Bolero Vol. 1.” “I’m incredibly happy and honored with this Grammy win,” […]

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Illustrating India’s complex environmental crises

Abhijit Banerjee, the Ford Foundation International Professor of Economics at MIT, and Sarnath Banerjee (no relation), an MIT Center for Art, Science, and Technology (CAST) visiting artist share a similar background, but have very different ways of thinking. Both were raised for a time in Kolkata before leaving India to pursue divergent careers, Abhijit as […]

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On the screen: Anticipated spy flick falls flat in unmemorable ‘Argylle’

Perhaps the only person I can blame for my disappointment with “Argylle” is myself. From the first trailer, something about “Argylle” captured my imagination — it came in highly anticipated — but when credits rolled, I was left far from satisfied. “Argylle” is the latest film by director Matthew Vaughn — who previously helmed the […]

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Art examines life

Wood sculptor Deb Lowney strives to create work that is visually intriguing, intellectually stimulating and that invites viewers to consider social issues. In 2014, her exhibit, “Canary In a Coal Mine” shown at Fireweed Gallery, combined 20 sculptures with various quotes and statements addressing climate change issues. One piece included in the exhibit, “Hanging On,” […]

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A night at the orchestra, with Pokémon on the program

Around 50 musicians crowd the well-lit Kresge Auditorium stage. They wear formal black attire and concentrated facial expressions. As the conductor carefully raises her baton, the audience comes to a perfect silence. A single piano lets forth a delicate cascade of high-pitched notes and is soon joined by a dozen violins that burst into a […]

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Opening the doorway to drawing

On the first Friday in November, the students of 21A.513 (Drawing Human Experience) were greeted by two unfamiliar figures: a bespectacled monkey holding a heart-shaped message (“I’m so glad you are here”) and the person who drew that monkey on the whiteboard: award-winning cartoonist and educator Lynda Barry, whose “Picture This” was a central text […]

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Performance art and science collide as students experience “Blue Man Group”

On a blustery December afternoon, with final exams and winter break on the horizon, the 500 undergraduate students enrolled in Professor Bradley Pentelute’s Course 5.111 (Principles of Chemical Science) class were treated to an afternoon at the theater — a performance of “Blue Man Group” at Boston’s Charles Playhouse — courtesy of Pentelute and the […]

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Solving complex problems with technology and varied perspectives at Sphere Las Vegas

Something new, large, and round has dominated the Las Vegas skyline since July: Sphere. After debuting this summer, the state-of-the-art entertainment venue became instantly recognizable thanks to pictures and videos on social media and Reddit. Some of the most viral posts depict the 580,000-square-foot, fully programmable LED Exosphere projecting a giant yellow emoji that smiles, […]

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Michael John Gorman named MIT Museum director

MIT has appointed Michael John Gorman the Mark R. Epstein (Class of 1963) Director of the recently re-imagined MIT Museum. Gorman replaces longtime museum director John Durant, who stepped down in 2023. Originally from Ireland, Gorman is the founding director of BIOTOPIA – Naturkundemuseum Bayern in Munich, Germany, a newly established innovative center and museum […]

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Turning history of science into a comic adventure

The Covid-19 pandemic taught us how complex the science and management of infectious disease can be, as the public grappled with rapidly evolving science, shifting and contentious policies, and mixed public health messages. The purpose of scientific communication is to make the complexity of such topics engaging and accessible while also making sure the information […]

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Bunnell to host Maker’s Spaces for parade

The Bunnell Street Arts Center exhibit gallery may be closed for the month of January, but that doesn’t mean things aren’t still happening behind their doors. Bunnell, in partnership with Homer Drawdown, will host two weekend Maker’s Space sessions for community members to build walkable, wearable sculptures, such as marionettes, puppets and masks, to “outlandishly […]

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What’s happening at Homer Counil on the Arts this month

Since 1975, Homer Council on the Arts has been offering performances, exhibitions and arts education for community members of all ages and abilities, serving the community by creating space and opportunities for people and innovative ideas. Here are HCOA-hosted events and activities through January. All take place at the HCOA Gallery unless otherwise indicated. Ceramics […]

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3 Questions: A new home for music at MIT

More than 1,500 students enroll in music classes each year at MIT. More than 500 student musicians participate in one of 30 on-campus ensembles. In spring 2025, to better provide for its thriving musical program, MIT will inaugurate its new music building, a 35,000-square-foot three-volume facility adjacent to Kresge Auditorium. The new building will feature […]

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Co-creating climate futures with real-time data and spatial storytelling

Virtual story worlds and game engines aren’t just for video games anymore. They are now tools for scientists and storytellers to digitally twin existing physical spaces and then turn them into vessels to dream up speculative climate stories and build collective designs of the future. That’s the theory and practice behind the MIT WORLDING initiative. […]

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Building technology that empowers city residents

Kwesi Afrifa came to MIT from his hometown of Accra, Ghana, in 2020 to pursue an interdisciplinary major in urban planning and computer science. Growing up amid the many moving parts of a large, densely populated city, he had often observed aspects of urban life that could be made more efficient. He decided to apply […]

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Culturally informed design: Unearthing ingenuity where it always was

Pedro Reynolds-Cuéllar, an MIT PhD student in both media arts and sciences and art, culture, and technology (ACT), explores how technology and culture intersect in spaces often overlooked by mainstream society, stretching beyond the usual scope of design research. A former lecturer and researcher at MIT D-Lab with experience in robotics, Reynolds-Cuéllar is an ACT […]

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Carlo Ratti named curator of 2025 Venice Biennale Architecture Exhibition

MIT scholar Carlo Ratti has been named curator of the Venice Biennale’s 19th International Architecture Exhibition, to be held in 2025. The large-scale exhibition is the world’s best-known showcase for architectural work. It began in 1980 and has normally been held every two years since then. Ratti is an expert in urban design and planning, […]

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A flexible solution to help artists improve animation

Artists who bring to life heroes and villains in animated movies and video games could have more control over their animations, thanks to a new technique introduced by MIT researchers. Their method generates mathematical functions known as barycentric coordinates, which define how 2D and 3D shapes can bend, stretch, and move through space. For example, […]

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Fengshui in the Qing Dynasty courtroom

Disputes over mining were common in late imperial China, during the Qing Dynasty. For instance, in the 1870s, Wu Tang, the governor-general of Sichuan province, enacted an outright ban on mining, despite an apparent economic need for it. The rationale Wu Tang and other mining opponents often used to support their decisions? Fengshui. That’s right, […]

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Hearing Amazônia: MIT musicians in Manaus, Brazil

On Dec. 13, the MIT community came together for the premiere of “We Are The Forest,” a documentary by MIT Video Productions that tells the story of the MIT musicians who traveled to the Brazilian Amazon seeking culture and scientific exchange. The film features performances by Djuena Tikuna, Luciana Souza, Anat Cohen, and Evan Ziporyn, with […]

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