Tag: Apocalypse Soon

Planet Is Screwed, Says Bank That Screwed the Planet

JP Morgan Chase is the world’s leading financer of fossil fuel projects. And according to a report from within the company, recently leaked to the press, the world is seriously underestimating the adverse effects of climate change. The 22-page report, entitled “Risky Business: the climate and the macroeconomy” and dated January 14, 2020, has been […]

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Beware a Bezos Bearing Gifts

Beyond a vaguely worded Instagram post, we don’t know much about how Jeff Bezos will spend the $10 billion he recently pledged to climate action through the Bezos Earth Fund. The richest man on the planet says his “global initiative” will fund “scientists, activists NGOs—any effort that offers a real possibility to help preserve and […]

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The Coronavirus’s Lesson for Climate Change

This week, analysis from the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air estimated that government-directed quarantines and other restrictions due to the current coronavirus outbreak have temporarily reduced China’s greenhouse gas emissions by a quarter. China is currently the world’s largest emitter, even though the carbon footprints of most Chinese residents remain minuscule compared […]

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This Is Why the GOP Can’t Have Nice Climate Plans

California Representative Kevin McCarthy just can’t catch a break. Parts of his district were on fire last year, and—thanks partially to those blazes—climate change is a top concern for voters in his state, which has passed some of the most ambitious emissions reductions measures in the nation. Yet fossil fuel interests have been some of McCarthy’s […]

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The Challenge of Sustainable Chocolate

The long black pruning poles looked cumbersome. But the farmers moved quickly, swarming over the small plot of land and hoisting the poles up to slice through cacao branches with ease. On the bottom end of the pole was a small gasoline engine; on the top, a chainsaw. Buzzing sounds mixed with the humming of […]

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What Wall Street Really Means When It Talks About “Climate Risk”

In Kim Stanley Robinson’s recent climate change novel, New York 2140, New York City has been devastated by rising seas: The Atlantic Ocean has inundated Brooklyn and Queens, and lower Manhattan now lies in the shallows at high tide. Downtown real estate has become physically unstable and economically volatile. But as new construction technologies stabilize […]

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The EU Says It Cares About Climate Change. Ireland Could Test That.

Ireland’s left-leaning nationalist party Sinn Féin won a historic upset this past weekend, taking the highest vote share in the country’s general election and effectively breaking a century of centrist and right-wing two-party rule by Fine Gael and Fianna Fái. The race was dominated by issues of dwindling public investment, healthcare and housing. But as […]

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How Ditching the Iowa Caucus Could Remake the Biofuels Debate

In the wake of Iowa’s caucus vote-counting disaster, political staffers and pollsters alike are reconsidering the state’s “first in the nation to vote” status. The quaint caucuses and infamous fry-forward state fair could disappear were Iowa were to be dethroned. But so too could one of Iowa’s largest industries, which has managed to carve out […]

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If Bloomberg Really Cared About Climate Change, He Wouldn’t Be Running

Climate-friendly billionaires are a bit of a paradox. Their multi-home, private-jet lifestyles spew prodigious amounts of greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. Even those who donate massively to environmental causes tend to be doing more to warm the earth than your average meat-eating car-driver subsisting below the poverty line. There are two such paradoxical beings in […]

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The Trump Official Who Could Obliterate Public Lands

It’s a natural fit for an administration as chaotic and corrupt as President Donald Trump’s that William Perry Pendley, who loathes America’s public lands, was picked last September, and reappointed in January, to manage them. The Bureau of Land Management, which Pendley now directs, oversees more acreage of the public domain than any other federal agency. Thus […]

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What the Green New Deal Could Mean for Iowa

Since the idea of a wide-reaching plan to stimulate the economy, combat inequality, and curb climate change entered the national spotlight in 2018, Fox News and the Republican Party have suggested it might be at odds with rural America. Conservative pundits have cited its association with a democratic socialist from New York City, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, […]

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Selling the Green New Deal to Texas Unions

Texas’s 10th Congressional District stretches, improbably, from the outer fringes of the Houston metro area to suburbs West of Austin. After sending Democrats to Congress for over 100 years, it has voted Republican Representative Michael McCaul in every election since its 2005 redistricting. Two years ago, Mike Siegel—a civil rights lawyer and labor activist running […]

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Beyond the Growth Gospel

The history of modern economic planning doubles as a resort travelogue. In 1947, the forefathers of neoliberalism launched their world-conquering project at the Hôtel Du Parc on Mont Pèlerin in the Swiss Alps. Global economic consensus has remained synonymous with jet-setting hospitality in the decades since. From Davos to Doha, today’s brave new market masters […]

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America’s Climate Refugees Are Pleading for Help. The Government Has No Answer.

In December, as the remaining Democratic primary candidates participated in another one of the seemingly endless string of presidential debates, Senator Amy Klobuchar was asked about climate-forced relocation efforts. “I very much hope we will not have to relocate entire cities, but we will probably have to relocate some individual residents,” she said. On January […]

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Why Tourism Should Die—and Why It Won’t

These aren’t easy days for travel touts. The class of journalists who enjoy comped experiences at Hawaiian resorts and Michelin-starred restaurants don’t normally generate a lot of public compassion. But I couldn’t help feeling a few pangs of sympathy for the writers and editors who put together The New York Times’ recent Travel package “52 […]

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