Tag: Animal Migration

Canada’s Sparrows Are Singing a New Song. You’ll Hear It Soon.

Even if you’re not a bird person, you probably know the jaunty song of the white-throated sparrow. It plays on loop in North America’s boreal forests, a classic as familiar as the chickadee’s trill and the mourning dove’s dirge. It even has its own mnemonic, “Old Sam Peabody-Peabody-Peabody.” The sparrow’s old triplet Hear that “Old […]

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They Wanted You to Bet on Sharks. The Odds Were Not in Their Favor.

Some bookies warn that you’ll sleep with the fishes. But one oddsmaker wanted you to bet on them instead. Last Wednesday, MyBookie, an online sportsbook, invited gamblers to place wagers on the summer migration patterns of nine great white sharks. The company’s website displayed odds on various aspects of each shark’s travel itinerary, using data […]

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With an Internet of Animals, Scientists Aim to Track and Save Wildlife

The International Space Station, orbiting some 240 miles above the planet, is about to join the effort to monitor the world’s wildlife — and to revolutionize the science of animal tracking. A large antenna and other equipment aboard the orbiting outpost, installed by spacewalking Russian astronauts in 2018, are being tested and will become fully […]

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Birds Do It. People, Too. Is Migration Simply Natural for All Species?

THE NEXT GREAT MIGRATIONThe Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move By Sonia Shah Every spring, more than 300 species of bird migrate north along traditional geographic “flyways” from their winter ranges in the Caribbean and Central and South America to their breeding grounds in the United States and Canada. One day in May, […]

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With the World on Pause, Salamanders Own the Road

Out they come on warm, wet spring nights, from beneath leaves and under logs and inside burrows where they have hibernated since fall: a veritable army of amphibians embarking on one of nature’s great migrations, albeit largely hidden from human sight and all too often ending beneath automobile tires. It is an ignominious fate for […]

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What’s Wrong With Butterflies Raised in Captivity?

Monarch butterflies look delicate, but they need to be super-tough to survive their annual migrations. The monarchs of eastern North America may travel thousands of miles to their winter home in Mexico’s Sierra Madre mountains. And, increasingly, they’re not making it, a problem that has been blamed on habitat loss, climate change and pesticides. In […]

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What the Caribou Taught Me About Being Together, and Apart

Over the past week, as each thread of our ordinary existence unravels and travel feels like something we used to do, I’ve been holding tight to a single mental image. The deep brown gaze of a caribou calf as it passed inches from my face. The whites of its eyes as it glanced at me […]

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In Delaware, Dams Are Being Removed to Spur Fish Migration

WILMINGTON, Del. — When migratory fish follow their ancestral instinct to swim up Delaware’s Brandywine Creek during this spring’s spawning season, they will find, for the first time in more than 200 years, that their route is not blocked by a dam. The fish — American shad, hickory shad and striped bass — have been […]

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Trump Administration Moves to Ease Rules Against Killing Birds

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration will move as early as Thursday to weaken a century-old law protecting migratory birds by dropping the threat of punishment to oil and gas companies, construction crews and other organizations that kill birds “incidentally” in the course of their operations. The proposed regulation, if finalized, would cement a legal opinion […]

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The Freshwater Giants Are Dying

Some of the most astonishing creatures on Earth hide deep in rivers and lakes: giant catfish weighing over 600 pounds, stingrays the length of Volkswagen Beetles, six-foot-long trout that can swallow a mouse whole. There are about 200 species of so-called freshwater megafauna, but compared to their terrestrial and marine counterparts, they are poorly studied […]

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It’s Fish vs. Dams, and the Dams Are Winning

NEWBURGH, N.Y. — For thousands of years, alewives and blueback herring have left the ocean to swim up the Hudson River to any one of scores of tributaries to lay their eggs. But in a more recent era, the fish have been literally hitting a wall as dams popped up all over the region, powering […]

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