Tag: Alternative and Renewable Energy

Treacherous Antarctic Waters Open Up, Just Briefly

Welcome to the Climate Fwd: newsletter. The New York Times climate team emails readers once a week with stories and insights about climate change. Sign up here to get it in your inbox. #g-antarctica-box , #g-antarctica-box .g-artboard { margin:0 auto; } #g-antarctica-box p { margin:0; } #g-antarctica-box .g-aiAbs { position:absolute; } #g-antarctica-box .g-aiImg { position:absolute; […]

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Planting Trees Won’t Save the World

One trillion trees. At the World Economic Forum last month, President Trump drew applause when he announced the United States would join the forum’s initiative to plant one trillion trees to fight climate change. More applause for the decision followed at his State of the Union speech. The trillion-tree idea won wide attention last summer […]

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The Agency That Brought Appalachia Electricity Must Focus on the Climate

In the 2020 Democratic primaries, presidential candidates are finally competing to put forward big ideas for tackling the climate crisis. One of the boldest comes from Bernie Sanders, who wants to spend a whopping $16 trillion of public money on a series of measures that includes a national takeover of electricity production in the United […]

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How Does a Nation Adapt to Its Own Murder?

BRUNY ISLAND, Australia — The name of the future is Australia. These words come from it, and they may be your tomorrow: P2 masks, evacuation orders, climate refugees, ocher skies, warning sirens, ember storms, blood suns, fear, air purifiers and communities reduced to third-world camps. Billions of dead animals and birds bloating and rotting. Hundreds […]

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The Freshwater Giants Are Dying

Some of the most astonishing creatures on Earth hide deep in rivers and lakes: giant catfish weighing over 600 pounds, stingrays the length of Volkswagen Beetles, six-foot-long trout that can swallow a mouse whole. There are about 200 species of so-called freshwater megafauna, but compared to their terrestrial and marine counterparts, they are poorly studied […]

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