Drake Fuels Cultural Appropriation Accusations With His New Feature

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Photo: Carmen Mandato (Getty Images)

The music Drake has released since the end of his historic rap battle with Kendrick Lamar has been questionable at best. First, he was featured on the boisterous Sexyy Redd track, “U My Everything,” where he attempts to turn the #BBLDrizzy beat to his advantage by rapping over it.

While some enjoyed it (like myself), others considered it a poor attempt at trying to change the meaning of the viral joke by rapping about how he often pays for women to have surgery on their bodies.

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On Monday, Drake popped out for his second musical feature following the beef on a song by social media comedian Snowd4y, titled, “Wah Gwan Delilah.” The track is a remix of the 2007 song, “Hey There Delilah,” by the American rock band Plain White T’s.

Listen below:

Snowd4y – Wah Gwan Delilah (feat. Drake) #snowd4y #drake

No that’s not AI. That is really the 6-God tapping into one of his many accents and doing his best to sound like a Jamaican reggae singer.

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Although it’s clear that the song is not meant to be taken seriously, and is meant to be an ode to Toronto content creators, this hasn’t stopped hip-hop fans on social media from clowning the “For All the Dogs” rapper to the point where they are claiming that Kendrick Lamar broke him as an artist.

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I guess K. Dot wasn’t lying when he said, “There’s no accent you can sell me.”

Either way, every one of Drake’s actions from this point on will be closely monitored since the public has come to the consensus that he lost to Lamar in their beef. It’ll take a no-doubt summer banger for fans to stop clowning the Toronto artist.

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The same could also be said for J. Cole, who infamously apologized to Lamar just days after releasing his diss track, “7 Minute Drill.”

Fans clowned him just as bad (if not worse) for his feature on the Cash Cobain song, “Grippy.”