The ‘Painful’ Reason Why the Ring Kobe Bryant Gifted to His Father Just Sold at Auction

Remember the 2000 NBA Finals? It was a historic moment in sports history. It’s the first time the legendary duo of Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal won a championship together. We still remember when Bryant jumped into O’Neal’s arms as the seconds ticked down during game 6 at the Staples Center. It was the official start of what would become an iconic NBA duo.

Bryant was so ecstatic about his first NBA Finals win, that he ordered a copy of his 2000 Championship ring to give to his father, Joe “Jellybean” Bryant, who played in the NBA for eight years. But it’s no longer in the possession of Kobe’s family.

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The ring was just sold by Goldin for $927,200 on March 30 to an unknown buyer. The winning bid was for $760,000, but with the buyer’s premium on top, the price tag went up nearly $170,000.

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Believe it or not, this is the third time the ring has been sold at auction. It was originally sold by his parents, Joe and Pam, in 2013, which caused a rift between the two sides.

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At the time, Kobe’s parents had plans to sell other sports memorabilia that belonged to the Lakers star, including his 1996 Pennsylvania high school championship ring, a signed basketball from the 2000 Lakers team, and a sweatsuit he wore at Lower Merion High School in Pennsylvania.

Things got so bad with the family that Kobe took his parents to court in May 2013, saying he never approved of them selling the items. The two sides eventually agreed on a settlement that allowed Joe and Pam to auction off six items for $500,000. This included the Lakers 2000 Championship ring that gifted to his father, which sold for $173,000.

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He even voiced his frustration publicly, writing on Twitter, “When u give Give GIVE and they take Take TAKE at wat point do u draw a line in the sand? #hurtbeyondmeasure #gavemenowarning #love?”

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Pam and Joe Bryant Make a Statement About Auction

In a statement to the Los Angeles Times, the couple said, “We want to make it unequivocally clear that we have no involvement in this sale of our son’s 2000 championship ring. The mere existence of the auction has reopened a deep, painful wound.”

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They continued, “We seek peace, and the opportunity to grieve with dignity. We appreciate your understanding and respect for our family’s privacy at this time. Thank you, and may God bless you.”

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