Chainsmokers concert promoters fined $20,000 for violating New York coronavirus policies

The concert promoters responsible for a charity event featuring The Chainsmokers in July have been fined $20,000 for violating New York state public health policies amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Videos shared on social media from the July 25 event showed the concertgoers in large crowds, with seemingly little social distancing and few masks, prompting a state investigation. The Southampton concert on Long Island was intended to be a drive-in charity concert that hosted various acts, with The Chainsmokers as the headliners.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office announced the fine Wednesday for violating an executive order by hosting a “non-essential” gathering and failure to enforce safety measures.

“As I said immediately following reports of this event, it was an egregious violation of the critical public health measures we have had in place since the beginning of this pandemic to protect New Yorkers from COVID-19,” Cuomo said in a statement.

“In the Know Experiences,” the promoters fined for the event, declined to comment to NBC News on Wednesday. A representative for The Chainsmokers also declined to comment.

The governor’s office said that the promoters failed to disclose a “friends and family” section, where concertgoers could gather and where mask-wearing was not enforced, in their permit application for the event. A state investigation also found that more than 2,150 people were in attendance, which exceeded the maximum allowed through the event’s permit.

The town of Southampton is now no longer allowed to approve group gathering permits without state approval, Cuomo also announced.

Concert rules required attendees to stay within a certain foot radius of their car and leave to use the restroom and to wear a mask while doing so, NBC’s “Today” reported at the time. The concert’s website stating the rules is no longer available.

Billboard reported prior to the concert that tickets ranged in price from $1,250 to $25,000, the profits of which would go to various charities including No Kid Hungry, Children’s Medical Fund of NY and Southampton Fresh Air Home.

Diana Dasrath contributed.

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