Publishers Are Still Battling Book Tariffs As Deadlines Loom

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A few types of books are already exempt from the September tariff: Children’s picture books, … [+] coloring books, and drawing books.

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US book publishers are in the midst of a paperwork-powered attempt to avoid tariffs imposed on September 1 by the Trump Administration. Following US trade representative rules, an “exclusion process” opens up a few months after a tariff is imposed — in the case of the September 1 tariff on Chinese imports, that exclusion window lasts from October 31 until January 31.

During this time, publishers must submit requests for their books to be excluded from the tariff.

If the request is granted, publishers receive a refund for the duties they’ve already paid out. And any publishers affected by the December 15 tariff will have a chance to file requests under a second exclusion process in the early months of 2020.

Requests won’t need to be filed on a per-title basis, however: According to an article from Publisher’s Weekly, “If the USTR grants an exclusion for a particular group of titles, that exclusion will apply to all books within the category from any publisher.”

How high are the chances that the publishers’ appeals will land them the exclusions they’re hoping for? Not that high, but the process is still worth an attempt, according to one represetative from Meadows Wye &amp; Co., an international logistics company specializing in the publishing industry.

“&lsqb;I&rsqb;t is worth the time for publishers to apply for exclusions,” Publisher’s Weekly says, reporting on an opinion from Ray Ambriano of Meadows Wye &amp; Co. “Ambriano explained that exclusions were granted for some products on earlier lists, but exclusions have become fewer as the process has rolled on.”

A few types of books are already exempt from the September tariff — children’s picture books, coloring books, drawing books — but all other trade books, educational books, and professional books that are printed in China will be impacted.

Publishers can apply for exclusion through a web portal from the U.S. Trade Representative.

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US book publishers are in the midst of a paperwork-powered attempt to avoid tariffs imposed on September 1 by the Trump Administration. Following US trade representative rules, an “exclusion process” opens up a few months after a tariff is imposed — in the case of the September 1 tariff on Chinese imports, that exclusion window lasts from October 31 until January 31.

During this time, publishers must submit requests for their books to be excluded from the tariff.

If the request is granted, publishers receive a refund for the duties they’ve already paid out. And any publishers affected by the December 15 tariff will have a chance to file requests under a second exclusion process in the early months of 2020.

Requests won’t need to be filed on a per-title basis, however: According to an article from Publisher’s Weekly, “If the USTR grants an exclusion for a particular group of titles, that exclusion will apply to all books within the category from any publisher.”

How high are the chances that the publishers’ appeals will land them the exclusions they’re hoping for? Not that high, but the process is still worth an attempt, according to one represetative from Meadows Wye & Co., an international logistics company specializing in the publishing industry.

“[I]t is worth the time for publishers to apply for exclusions,” Publisher’s Weekly says, reporting on an opinion from Ray Ambriano of Meadows Wye & Co. “Ambriano explained that exclusions were granted for some products on earlier lists, but exclusions have become fewer as the process has rolled on.”

A few types of books are already exempt from the September tariff — children’s picture books, coloring books, drawing books — but all other trade books, educational books, and professional books that are printed in China will be impacted.

Publishers can apply for exclusion through a web portal from the U.S. Trade Representative.