Twitter Offers ‘Thoughts and Prayers’ After NRATV Meets Its Untimely Demise

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In the immediate aftermath of tragedy, the phrase “thoughts and prayers” is probably the last thing you want to hear. Especially if it’s in response to a mass shooting and coming from politicians or public figures with no intention of properly addressing gun reform.

On Tuesday, the New York Times reports that the plug got pulled on NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch and her pulpit of choice—the controversial network NRATV. But instead of offering flowers to mourn their losses, Twitter went the peak petty route and offered thoughts and prayers instead.

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Apparently, we have ad firm Ackerman McQueen to thank. They’ve been involved in a bitter legal spat with the NRA after severing all business ties with the gun rights group.

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From the New York Times:

The move comes amid a flurry of lawsuits between the N.R.A. and Ackerman, and increasing acrimony that surfaced after two prominent N.R.A. board members first criticized NRATV in an article in The Times in March. The separation had become inevitable: The two sides said last month that they were ending their three-decade-plus partnership.

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In a statement circulating among its members, the NRA appears to pin the blame on concerns that its propaganda messaging was being misconstrued.

“Many members expressed concern about the messaging on NRATV becoming too far removed from our core mission: defending the Second Amendment,” Wayne LaPierre, the N.R.A.’s longtime chief executive, wrote in a message to members that was expected to be sent out by Wednesday. “So, after careful consideration, I am announcing that starting today, we are undergoing a significant change in our communications strategy. We are no longer airing ‘live TV’ programming.”

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Ackerman McQueen, on the other hand, wants all the smoke.

“When given the opportunity to do the right thing, the N.R.A. once again has taken action that we believe is intended to harm our company even at the expense of the N.R.A. itself,” the company added. It said it “will continue to fight against the N.R.A.’s repeated violations of its agreement with our company with every legal remedy available to us.”

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It’s been a tumultuous year for the NRA. It suspended its top lobbyist and second-in-command Christopher W. Cox., braved investigations spearheaded by New York attorney general Letitia James, and struggled financially with NRATV providing such a meager return on its investment.

So on behalf of The Root, I’d like to extend our thoughts and prayers to the NRA.

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